Questions?

Do you have burning questions about the pre-med, medical school admission, and residency process? Post a comment, and I will happily answer any and all questions.

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Which medical school admissions book should I buy?

I have been receiving many questions about which of my three books should be read when. So I thought I would lay it out for you here.

How to be Pre-Med is meant for high school, early college, and non-traditional pre-meds trying to determine what is required in the pre-med process or looking for a way to assess how they have been doing so far. Though you want to read this book as early in your pre-med career as possible, it will be helpful throughout the pre-med process up until you apply to medical school. How to be Pre-Med is available in paperback and e-book formats through Amazon and Barnes&Noble.

The Medical School Admissions Guide is a step-by-step guide of the actual medical school admissions process. It's best read for the first time when you are certain you will be applying and then should be by your side ready to be reviewed as you move through each stage of the application process. In addition to weekly advice, the book also contains numerous personal statement, AMCAS work/activity, secondary essay, and letter of intent examples from successful applicants that will show you what it takes to get in and will stir up your creative juices. The Medical School Admissions Guide is available in paperback and e-book formats through Amazon and Barnes&Noble.

How to Get into Medical School with a Low GPA is an e-book directed to premeds who have a less than stellar academic record. It provides numerous scenarios and strategies of how to deal with a low GPA in medical school admissions. You might be surprised to know that a low GPA does not mean medical school doors are shut to you! The e-book is available through the website howtobepremed. Please note the website was recently hacked, and my technical team is diligently working to correct the issue. If you'd like a copy of How to Get into Medical School with a Low GPA now, feel free to send me an e-mail at info@MDadmit.com and we can complete the transaction via PayPal/e-mail.

As always, let me know if you have any questions.

Good luck and get in:)
--Dr. Miller

Suzanne M. Miller, MD, FACEP
Emergency Physician
CEO, MDadmit Medical Admissions
www.MDadmit.com
info@MDadmit.com
 

2 comments:

  1. Hi, I just discovered your site and I will be getting your book soon :) I was wondering though if you can give me some advice, I did not know I wanted to be a doctor until well like a few months ago! im in community college and will be transferring next year. I'm feeling really overwhelmed because where as most students have been starting at their freshman year I will barely be starting now. Because im not the traditional student I do not now how to even start, and where to start? I have not taken any of my science classes yet because I know it looks bad if I take them at my cc, at least that is what I have read. I know I will have to stay longer than just 2 years at my university because my gpa is 3.5 with grade forgiveness but probably much lower without. So I think I have 3 years before I should apply. When do you think I should start getting ready for the Mcat? Thank you so much :)

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    1. Addie - first off, take a deep breath! You are NOT behind. There is no set time line for medical school admissions. I have had many clients in their late 20s, 30s, and even 40s. I suggest starting with the book How to be Pre-Med, as that will lay out what you need to do academically and in the research, community service, extracurriclar, and clinical realm. Once you have read the book, sit down and make a timeline answering these questions: 1. How will you fit in the academic requirements. Will I have to stay an extra year or two? Will I need to do a post-bac? Remember, it's ok the take longer than the 'typical' pre-med. 2. How will I get all of the "other" stuff needed for medical school admissions in a way that doesn't check the boxes but allows me to do what I love? 3. Given 1 and 2, when is the best time for me to take the MCAT and have the score back before applying in June (of whatever year you choose to appy in)? The answer to these questions could put you on 2, 3, 4+ plan. And that's ok! I happy to discuss your individual situation further - check out www.MDadmit.com/get-started to see if you'd like to set up a strategy session.

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