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Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Best-Selling Author and Harvard MD Announces 3rd Edition of Acclaimed ‘The Medical School Admissions Guide’


Best-Selling Author and Harvard MD Announces 3rd Edition of Acclaimed ‘The Medical School Admissions Guide’

Sharing the week-by-week plan that got her into Harvard Medical School, Dr. Miller’s ‘The Medical School Admissions Guide’ has become a global best seller. Today, following a recent update, Miller announces the release of the book’s third edition.

For Immediate Release

Washington, DC – US medical schools have one of the most competitive graduate admissions processes in the world. With less than half of the 40,000 annual US medical school applicants gaining acceptance each year, understanding the complex admissions process and getting an edge over other candidates has never been more vital. Dr. Suzanne M. Miller has already helped pave the way for thousands of successful applicants with her acclaimed book ‘The Medical School Admissions Guide,’ the best-selling medical school admissions guide on Amazon for years. Today, she is delighted to announce the release of ‘The Medical School Admissions Guides’ new (third) edition.

‘The Medical School Admissions Guide: A Harvard MD’s Week-by-Week Admissions Handbook, 3rd Edition,’ offers a step-by-step guide for how to excel in the competitive, complex, and often stressful medical school admissions process. Given the ever-changing nature of medical school admissions, the guide contains information on the new MCAT2015, recent application changes, and additional examples from successful applicants. Dr. Miller has written the guide to be useful for anyone applying to medical school, from a college undergraduate to a non-traditional pre-med who has been out of school for years. The guide’s information comes as a result of the author’s decade of experience as a Harvard pre-med tutor, admissions interviewer, and medical school admissions consultant. Dr. Miller is also a practicing emergency physician and faculty member of multiple universities.
“I remember how stressful it was to be a pre-med. At the time of my application, I had wished there was a book that could break up the monstrous process looming ahead of me into digestible bits, while also providing real-life application examples from previous medical school applicants. Thus, I wrote ‘The Medical School Admissions Guide,’ the book I had wanted so desperately when I was applying to medical school,” says Dr. Miller, who has now written five books on pre-med and medical admissions topics.
She continues, “If you follow this guide, you will be prepared for every step in the process, hit each deadline with ease, and create your best application.”
Official Blurb:
The newly updated 3rd edition of Dr. Suzanne M. Miller's acclaimed ‘The Medical School Admissions Guide’ includes MCAT2015 insights, recent medical school application changes, and additional examples from successful applicants. As with previous best-selling versions of ‘The Medical School Admissions Guide,’ this 3rd edition contains the weekly, step-by-step plan Dr. Miller used to get into Harvard Medical School. She has since utilized the strategy to help hundreds of applicants gain entry into medical school first as a Harvard pre-med tutor and then as CEO of MDadmit, a medical admissions consulting service. Following this handbook's advice will provide you a distinct advantage in the competitive medical school admissions process as it prepares you for every step and helps create your best application.

Book Highlights include:
1. Weekly, easy-to-follow advice on navigating the complex admissions process.
2. Multiple examples of successful personal statements, AMCAS and TMDSAS work/activities, secondary essays, and letter of intent/update letters.
3. Special sections on reapplicants, non-traditional applicants, DO schools, foreign schools, and military/public health service options.
Having garnered consistent five-star reviews, Dr. Miller believes the book offers a vital insight into a process that is getting tougher by the day. “I have clients with 4.0 GPAs and MCAT scores in the 40s who sought my services after they did not get in. It seems like everyone has impressive grades, important research experiences, interesting extracurriculars, and life-changing community services and clinical experiences. Getting the edge has never been more important,” she adds.
‘The Medical School Admissions Guide: A Harvard MD’s Week-by-Week Admissions Handbook, 3rd Edition,’ published by MDadmit, is available now from Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Medical-School-Admissions-Guide-Week/dp/1936633809/ and Barnes & Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-medical-school-admissions-guide-suzanne-m-miller/1119020260?ean=9781936633807.

More information can be found on Dr. Miller’s blog: http://mdadmit.blogspot.com/

About Dr. Suzanne Miller
Dr. Suzanne M. Miller was raised near Washington, DC and studied history and science at Harvard College. While attending Harvard Medical School, she began admissions consulting as a Harvard pre-medical tutor and then co-chair of the Eliot House Pre-Medical Committee. After receiving her MD, she trained at Stanford University in emergency medicine.

Dr. Miller continues to work as an emergency physician and professor both nationally and internationally while running MDadmit, a medical admissions consulting service. She is also proud to lead the successful MDadmit Admissions Bootcamps. Dr. Miller enjoys teaching, traveling internationally, and serving as a physician for Racing the Planet adventure races, activities that have allowed her to make footprints on seven continents.
Please find Dr. Miller's bio highlights and awards at http://mdadmit.com/who-we-are and press page at http://www.mdadmit.com/press-room.
Her progress can also be followed on Facebook and Twitter.
Contact
Dr. Suzanne M. Miller
202.738.4353
Reviews

‘The Medical School Admissions Guide, 3rd Edition’ is already receiving stellar reviews:
“Buying this book is one of the most cost-effective things any pre-med could possibly do. Dr. Miller's week-by-week guide sets itself apart from other books in this category by breaking the application process down in to weekly, bite-size steps, that are easy to follow yet add up to an impressive final application. This third edition has kept pace with the ever-changing requirements (MCAT 2015!!) and deadlines of the admissions process. Dr. Miller's personal experience and expertise shine through and the examples provided - of personal statements, AMCAS work/activities, secondary essays, and letters of intent - are all from real-life applicants - many are from traditional pre-meds but also a good number are from non-traditional applicants. Seeing how a diverse group of applicants approach and frame their application 'story' has been priceless. It also has sections on DO schools, foreign schools, military and public health service options. I could not recommend this book highly enough.”
“The guide is for both traditional and nontraditional applicants, I myself was a nontraditional applicant, so I found the abundance of examples to be helpful -- most books seem to be written ex de facto for traditional premeds… with this guide alone, I was able to keep pace with the full process of the AMCAS (primary, secondary, interview brain storming, and post interview strategies). At first, the timeline and examples in the book may seem daunting to emulate, but this reflects how competitive and how diverse top medical schools expect from their applicants to be. And on each of my five interviews, I met applicants who had backgrounds just as grandiose as those in the book, so it's a good barometer for your competition/cohort. Now that I've been through the process, was sent 8 interview invites, attended 5 (accepted into all 5 programs, all US MD), and offered a few scholarships, I'd say this book did a good job at painting my narrative in a cogent manner to argue my admittance and keeping me informed about the "little things" that matter which I never considered. I would highly recommend this book for any premeds close to applying in need of an actual guide of how it really is, and how you're really expected to put your application together at a professional level.”

Tuesday, April 1, 2014


 I wanted to say thank you to the Doctor or Bust blog for it's recent review of The Medical School Admissions Guide.

http://doctororbust.wordpress.com/2014/03/28/msag-dont-apply-without-it/

I love seeing pre-meds succeed, and Doctor or Bust is another glowing example!

Get going and get in!

--Dr. Miller


Suzanne M. Miller, MD, FACEP
Emergency Physician
CEO, MDadmit Medical Admissions
www.MDadmit.com
202.738.4353

Author of:
How to be Pre-Med
The Medical School Admissions Guide
How To Get Into Medical School with a Low GPA

Monday, March 31, 2014

New Edition of Best-Selling Medical School Admissions Guide Now Available

Greetings pre-meds!

MDadmit is very proud to announce the new edition of Dr. Suzanne M. Miller's best-selling The Medical School Admissions Guide: A Harvard MD's Week-by-Week Admissions Handbook now available at:

Amazon
Barnes and Noble



What's new? It's the newly updated 3rd edition of Dr. Suzanne M. Miller's acclaimed The Medical School Admissions Guide, complete with MCAT2015 insights, recent medical school application changes, and additional examples from successful applicants. As with previous best-selling versions of The Medical School Admissions Guide, this 3rd edition contains the weekly, step-by-step plan Dr. Miller used to get into Harvard Medical School. She has since utilized the strategy to help hundreds of applicants gain entry into medical school first as a Harvard pre-med tutor and then as CEO of MDadmit, a medical admissions consulting service. Following this handbook's advice will provide you a distinct advantage in the competitive medical school admissions process as it prepares you for every step and helps create your best application. Book Highlights include: 1. Weekly, easy-to-follow advice on navigating the complex admissions process. 2. Multiple examples of successful personal statements, AMCAS and TMDSAS work/activities, secondary essays, and letter of intent/update letters. 3. Special sections on reapplicants, non-traditional applicants, DO schools, foreign schools, and military/public health service options.

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Medical School Admissions (2013-2014 Cycle): Why does every pre-med bring a fancy portfolio and legal pad to medical school interviews?

If you have already undergone a medical school interview, you will have noticed that everyone brings a fancy, leather portfolio with a legal pad inside. You probably did too. But did you, or any other pre-med in attendance, actually use the portfolio? What's the point of bringing a portfolio if no one uses it?

I may surprise you by advising you DO bring a professional-looking portfolio with a legal pad. But I also suggest you actually use it to store some important items and take notes. Here's how a porfolio should be used in the medical school interview scenario:

1. Store a copy of your AMCAS application, secondary application for the school you are visiting, and any publications/abstracts in the inside folder. This will allow you to review these items prior to the interview or during breaks in the interview day. It is unlikely any interviewers will ask to see your publications, but it's not unheard of - so best to be prepared.
2. Put a small roll of dental floss into the pocket as well. I can't tell you how many times I've seen pre-meds with food stuck in their teeth when interviews occur after a meal. Having floss might just save you from an embarrassing situation.
3. Take notes! There is no need to take notes during the interview, as that may seem pretentious. But definitely jot down your thoughts after each interview making special note of:
Interview date
Interviewer name and title spelled correctly
Topics discussed
School positives
School negatives
Overall gut reaction
Taking five minutes to log your thoughts will be helpful in keeping the details of each school straight in your mind and remembering specifics to put in thank you notes. As schools start to blur together on the interview trail, these notes will be very helpful.

Good luck and get in!

Suzanne M. Miller, MD, FACEP
Emergency Physician
CEO, MDadmit Medical Admissions
www.MDadmit.com
415.939.5251

Author of:
How to be Pre-Med
The Medical School Admissions Guide
How To Get Into Medical School with a Low GPA

Sunday, November 3, 2013

Medical School Admissions (2013-2014 Cycle): It's not too late to receive an interview

I am receiving many anxious e-mails, calls, and tweets from pre-meds who have not yet received a medical school interview invite. Though it is a bit late in the cycle, there is no need to panic yet. Most medical schools still have some interview invites to hand out.

However, there are a few things you can do to determine if there is a problem with your application requiring immediate action:
1.  Review your AMCAS and secondaries with a medical school expert, such as your school's pre-med advisor or a medical school admissions consultant. I just had a client who realized certain classes had been categorized incorrectly on the AMCAS application, making the science GPA inappropriately low. This is the kind of issue that can sink a medical school application and needs to be addressed immediately through the appropriate AMCAS channels, such as submitting an official academic request form.
2. Call each school that you have applied to and returned a secondary application. Ask if your application is complete and if all interview invites have been given. You may find a secondary you submitted was never received. You will also learn if some interview invites remain.
3. Call each school that you have applied to and not received a secondary from and ensure the school has everything it needs prior to sending a secondary application. Also inquire about whether any more secondaries will be sent out (quite unlikely at this stage in the medical school cycle but it doesn’t hurt to ask).

The key here is to look for help and ask questions. Ignoring the situation because you are too busy or afraid of the answers is not the way to go. Get informed and fix any errors. You never know, asking for expert advice and making a few phone calls to medical schools could mean the difference between medical school acceptance and rejection.

As always, let me know if I can help!

Suzanne M. Miller, MD, FACEP
Emergency Physician
CEO, MDadmit Medical Admissions
www.MDadmit.com
415.939.5251

Author of:
How to be Pre-Med
The Medical School Admissions Guide
How To Get Into Medical School with a Low GPA

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Which medical school admissions book should I buy?

I have been receiving many questions about which of my three books should be read when. So I thought I would lay it out for you here.

How to be Pre-Med is meant for high school, early college, and non-traditional pre-meds trying to determine what is required in the pre-med process or looking for a way to assess how they have been doing so far. Though you want to read this book as early in your pre-med career as possible, it will be helpful throughout the pre-med process up until you apply to medical school. How to be Pre-Med is available in paperback and e-book formats through Amazon and Barnes&Noble.

The Medical School Admissions Guide is a step-by-step guide of the actual medical school admissions process. It's best read for the first time when you are certain you will be applying and then should be by your side ready to be reviewed as you move through each stage of the application process. In addition to weekly advice, the book also contains numerous personal statement, AMCAS work/activity, secondary essay, and letter of intent examples from successful applicants that will show you what it takes to get in and will stir up your creative juices. The Medical School Admissions Guide is available in paperback and e-book formats through Amazon and Barnes&Noble.

How to Get into Medical School with a Low GPA is an e-book directed to premeds who have a less than stellar academic record. It provides numerous scenarios and strategies of how to deal with a low GPA in medical school admissions. You might be surprised to know that a low GPA does not mean medical school doors are shut to you! The e-book is available through the website howtobepremed. Please note the website was recently hacked, and my technical team is diligently working to correct the issue. If you'd like a copy of How to Get into Medical School with a Low GPA now, feel free to send me an e-mail at info@MDadmit.com and we can complete the transaction via PayPal/e-mail.

As always, let me know if you have any questions.

Good luck and get in:)
--Dr. Miller

Suzanne M. Miller, MD, FACEP
Emergency Physician
CEO, MDadmit Medical Admissions
www.MDadmit.com
info@MDadmit.com
 

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

Medical School Admissions (2013-2014 Cycle): Interview preparation for inevitable Obamacare questions

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Fall is in the air and the medical school interview season is upon us! 

With all of the shenanigans happening in Washington, DC these days, the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) is on the forefront of many minds - including your interviewers! This means you are very likely to be asked at least one question about Obamacare. In fact, the majority of my clients tell me they have been asked about Obamacare in their recent interviews.

So this leads to the query I am receiving almost daily from premeds around the country: "How do I prepare for an Obamacare question?

Luckily, I won't suggest you read the many thousands of pages of the Affordable Care Act. Most politicians who voted on the bill haven't read the entire thing. But I do suggest getting as familiar as you can with the basics of the bill - both positive and negative. This will take some research and reading on your part. 

1. Starting with newspaper media coverage. Go to your favorite major newspaper (New York Times, Washington Post, LA Times, Wall Street Journal, etc.) and type 'Obamacare' or 'Affordable Care Act' into the search term. You will see dozens of relevant articles pop up. Look for summarizing articles that explain the bill in layman's terms and opinion pieces that give one point of view. Start a paper or virtual file of the articles and organize them so you can review them later if needed for future interview preparation.
2. Search sources such as The Economist, The New York Times Magazine, and The New Yorker for longer, often more detailed articles on the Affordable Care Act. Soak up the details and pay attention to the pro and con arguments given.
3. Spend thirty minutes a day with your favorite news source - be it network TV news, CNN, Huffington Post, or even Twitter. Pay attention to any comments on Obamacare and think about whether or not you agree with the opinions presented.

After doing your research, it’s time to form your own opinion. Brainstorm what you think are the three biggest positives and three biggest negatives of Obamacare. Determine what you would do to improve the bill if you had the power. Think about what a health care reform bill would look like if you were president.

After this process, you will be ready for the vast majority of questions interviewers with ask during a medical school interview. The key is to be knowledgeable on the subject, see both sides, and be able to state your opinion clearly.

Congrats if you have already received interviews and good luck if you are still waiting.

--Dr. Miller

Suzanne M. Miller, MD, FACEP
Emergency Physician
CEO, MDadmit Medical Admissions
www.MDadmit.com
415.939.5251

Author of:
How to be Pre-Med
The Medical School Admissions Guide
How To Get Into Medical School with a Low GPA